Dare to think and ask   

Wouldn’t media be different if each item of bad news was balanced by one of good news?

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Dare I ask why bad news outnumbers the few stories of good news and good deeds?

It is a shame to hear that “bad news sells.”

Wouldn’t media be different if each item of bad news was balanced by one of good news?

You’d say there is no good news. Nonsense!

There’s people helping people before, during and after COVID, overcoming impossible health complications, surgeons saving lives of infants with life threatening defects, young people succeeding despite poor childhoods, release of prisoners wrongfully convicted, daring rescues, survivors of terrible  calamities, miracles of human perseverance.

Do we really need documentaries about losers who won’t work, master criminals, drug kingpins, street and biker gangs, drug addicts, tax cheats, marriage cheats, politicians with prostitutes, people defrauding seniors and employees of life savings and pensions, PTSD, depression, stress, obsessing about health?

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Negative stories birth negative thinking and set poor examples to young minds.

Let’s hear about the majority who do daily acts of courage, kindness and volunteering without publicity or gain.

About students who overcome a poor childhood and disadvantages and make a go of it by hard work and diligence.

About those with disabilities who support themselves and their families.

We need inspiring stories about good behaviour, success, and overcoming disadvantages, more about law abiding and public spirited citizens.

We should be as quick to video the numberless good deeds by police officers as we are to catch negative videos of police actions.

I am no Pollyanna, but I look for good in everything.

Stories of good deeds rarely make the headlines.

This column by Joe Aldrich was buried in the paper: North Dakota generously makes COVID vaccines available to 4,000 Manitoba truckers crossing the border.

This deal makes up for Manitoba’s shortage of vaccines from Ottawa.

Praise for Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister and North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum for cross-border co-operation.

“The governor knows if the shoe was on the other foot, I would be first to help”, said Pallister.

The deal could be extended to other essential workers who cross the border.

Even Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe has reached out to Burgum.

A Goodwill store employee, Andrea Lessing, mother of a six-year-old, turned over $42,000 she found in a clothing donation.

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Andrea’s honest nature propelled her to do the right thing. Asked about her motivation in returning the cash, she credited her belief in good karma. “I do believe that if you do something good, something good will come back to you.”

She was tempted to keep the money only for a moment, because she always strives to be a good example to her daughter. She received a $1,000 reward.

A California police officer, Kirk Keffer, saw a Black teen walking at 11 p.m. in an industrial area. He asked him what he was doing, and the lad said he was walking home after his work shift.

His car had died, his bikes was stolen, and he did not want to keep bumming rides, so he walked over 4 hours a day to and from work.

The officer drove him home and was inspired to ask the chief if the department could replace the lad’s bicycle.

The answer was yes and four officers presented it to Jourdan Duncan.

There are lots of Kirks in the police.

Reach Gene Monin at adios43@yahoo.com

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